NEWS

2020-05-07_Prof Soballe 1
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07/Jun/2020

From the Hip Unit we want to thank Professor Kjeld Söballe (Aarhus -Denmark), brilliant hip and pelvic surgeon, former chairman of the scientific committee of the European Hip Society (EHS); he in 2006 (2 years before I published it in the American Journal JBJS Am 2008) taught me the mini-invasive technique. Our fortune is to have known him, his generosity, didactic commitment. We can never thank him as he deserves.

First of all thank you friend Kjeld.

He was the one who realized that Ganz periacetabular osteotomy could be done by a mini-invasive approach that does not compromise the muscles, produces less bleeding, much less postoperative pain, and a faster return to everyday activities, including sport.

Today there is an undetermined number of athletes with moderate dysplasia, with a ratio of 4 to 5 women to 1 man, although there are ethnic and genetic factors. Low-grade dysplasia is not always detected at birth or during the first year of life.

Mini-invasive periacetabular osteotomy requires a highly specialized and coordinated medical and nursing team. We can see in the image Dr. Luis Ramírez placing the screws while Dr. Ribas maintains the correct redirection of the acetabulum to give normal three-dimensional coverage of the femoral head by the acetabulum. In our experience, there is no limit or residual standard dysplasia that is the same as another. Treatment is individualized patient by patient under a detailed preoperative calculation. We recommend reading on Instagram – Linkedin or on Twitter of “Periacetabular osteotomy step by step” by Dr. Luis Ramírez.


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