Pioneers in Spain in the mini-invasive approach in hip dysplasia surgery

4 September, 2020 by admin0
2020-09-08_Quirón
2020-09-08_Quirón1

The medical team of the Hip Unit of the Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology of the Hospital Universitari Dexeus (ICATME), led by Dr. Manel Ribas, has published in the latest issue of the Spanish Journal of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology (RECOT) the first large series in Southern Europe of cases of periacetabular osteotomy using a mini-invasive technique in the treatment of residual hip dysplasia.

This is a retrospective study of 131 patients who underwent this technique at the Dexeus University Hospital between 2007 and 2016. The study concludes that the periacetabular osteotomy using the mini-invasive approach allows to restore the coverage of the acetabulum, correcting dysplasia, improving capacity. functional and quality of life of the operated patients.

Residual hip dysplasia

“Residual hip dysplasia is a more common pathology than is believed. At the end of growth, the head of the femur, for different reasons, may not have been well covered by the acetabulum and hip instability and alteration of the hip occurs. a series of stabilizing structures that in the long run produce pain and loss of functional capacity, which leads to the need to implant a prosthesis “, explained Dr. Manel Ribas, head of the Hip Unit of the Hospital Universitari Dexeus.

Classic approach

In recent decades there have been various attempts to try to restore these hips but it was not until 1988 that Dr. Ganz from the University of Bern developed a technique capable of correcting this pathology. It is a periacetabular osteotomy that, through four cuts around the acetabulum, allows it to be rotated in a way that provides more coverage to the head of the femur and recovers the contact of the patient’s natural cartilage between the acetabulum and the femur, protecting the joint.

In 2003 Dr. Manel Ribas was the first Spanish surgeon to perform this technique. “However,” adds the surgeon, “with the aim of continuing to improve, in 2007 at the recently opened Hospital Universitari Dexeus we performed the first periacetabular osteotomy using a mini-invasive technique described by Dr. Soballe”.

“This new surgical approach consists of making a series of blind cuts, which are visualized with the help of a radiological team in the operating room, avoiding the muscle so that we achieve less bleeding, less surgical time, less post-operative pain, a rapid functional recovery and an aesthetic improvement over the previous technique “.

The study published by RECOT compiles the first 131 cases of mini-invasive periacetabular osteotomy performed by Dr. Ribas’ team at the Dexeus University Hospital and analyzes the medium and long-term results.

According to Dr. Luis Ramírez Nuñez, surgeon of the hip unit and first signatory of the study, “the patients treated with this technique achieved correct acetabular coverage with few complications and with a significant improvement in functional results.”

“Four years after undergoing the operation, 98% of the patients did not need to undergo any other procedure since the intervention had completely solved the dysplasia,” he adds.

 

Underdiagnosed pathology

Dr. Ribas affirms that “it is important to be able to diagnose and treat residual dysplasia since it is an underdiagnosed pathology that is extremely confusing with other hip pathologies such as acetabular shock injury and requires a differentiated treatment”.

The Hip Unit of the Dexeus University Hospital is a benchmark in the performance of this technique that is performed on a regular basis. Since Dr. Ribas’s first intervention in 2007, nearly 500 surgeries have been performed using this technique.

This news has been published on the Quirón Dexeus Hospital website. You can see it by pressing here.


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